Reading Time: 2 minutes

When you think of awards, the Oscars, Emmys, and Golden Globes probably come to mind, but you probably might not think about advertising agency awards. But for a business like ours, we have been asked to submit and participate, to be in the running for these industry awards, time and time again. Let’s examine what these awards are and if they really mean anything to clients.

We’ll start off with the fact that “awards” in our industry, as with most, are big business. Awards are given out by media marketing platforms like The Drum and Digiday, as well as through industry associations like, The Association of Marketing and Communication Professionals with their ‘MarComm Awards’ and the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences with their ‘Webby Awards’ just to name a few.

There are awards for:

  • Digital Media
  • Print Media
  • Creative Design
  • Strategic Communications
  • Content Marketing
  • Audio / Video
  • Industry Leaders
  • Technology
  • Strategy
  • Distribution
  • Editorial
  • And more!

For a media planning and buying agency, like ours there are awards for:

  • Best Media Plan
  • Best Use of Emergent Media
  • Most Diverse Spending
  • Best Brand Integration into Gaming/Sports
  • Best Brand Integration into Traditional Media
  • And more!

With more than eight thousand businesses in the advertising industry (Statista 2019), it’s easy to see why this became big business and how there would be so many opportunities to “win”. But how do any of these companies get nominated. Who gets to choose where the entries come from? In many cases, it’s the businesses themselves vying for a chance to get recognized by the companies promoting the awards. And many of these opportunities come at a very high cost.

According to an interview with an ‘agency CEO’ done by Forbes, the CEO had to “defend his decision to spend $250,000 on entry fees”, because “winning awards is how he benchmarks his agency.” That doesn’t seem right. In that same article, the writer noted that the actual “usefulness as any type of industry benchmarking regarding who is doing outstanding work is predicated on the quality and robustness of the judging process.” So, the question is, who are they to judge? Could the winners based on the amount of investment spent to win awards and agencies willing to spend it? That may be why the larger, popular, and wealthier agencies are the ones “highlighting” all their winning awards.

It isn’t that winning an award for something should be overlooked. Our agency won an award for our Out of Home Strategy for “Best Alcohol Advertising and Promotions”. Yes, believe it or not, there are awards that get that specific.

And of course, as a media agency, we were very proud to win, but we didn’t nominate ourselves and we don’t hang our hat on those kinds of things. It means more to us when our own clients tell us they appreciate what we do for them. Getting them the best media placements and unique opportunities, while saving them money. No award necessary.

Reading Time: 4 minutes

One beautiful morning in the glory of the fluorescent light inside your office you are leafing through a stack of old brochures and marketing pieces containing information explaining the services your company has to offer. As you are starring at them, you abruptly come to the realization that the material is not only outdated but if you are being honest with yourself, the design looks like it came straight out of an 80’s commercial.

After a long search, you find a graphic designer that is going to transform your brochure into a modern, updated piece of art you will be proud to show prospective clients. For obvious reasons, you want to get this right the first time. But how can you assist the graphic designer in giving you the best possible solution for your company?

Communication is Key

In any working relationship, communication is the number one key factor. When describing to the designer what you are looking for, you want to be as detailed as possible. Do you want something modern and sleek? Casual and whimsical? Serious and simple? The more specific you are about what you are looking for, the easier it is going to be for the designer.

An expected timeline for the project is a component that is necessary to discuss. A mistake that is often made is the “let’s play it by ear.” This causes unforeseen conflicts. Communicate with the graphic designer and let them know all your expectations for each step in the process. Chances are you are going to have numerous meetings before the project is finished. If you would like to see a general layout of what they were thinking before the next meeting, tell them that. This keeps the project on task and moving at a pace you are both comfortable with.

When the designer brings you a rough first draft, give positive constructive criticism. Try to avoid suggestive language such as, “It just doesn’t feel right.” What doesn’t feel right? You are the client, and they are here to serve you. If you like the layout but the colors aren’t working for you, don’t just tell them you dislike the colors. Discuss with them either what colors you are considering or inquire what other color scheme they might recommend. Leaving the designer presuming what you want ends up wasting their time and yours.

Provide the Designer with All the Files They Need

The one thing a graphic designer does not want to hear before starting a project is, “Just pull all the things you need from our Facebook page.” While pulling pictures from a Facebook page is an easy task, it is something graphic designers avoid at all costs. Nine times out of ten, the pictures pulled from a Facebook page do not have high enough resolution to use in a professional capacity. When it comes to a logo, you want a high-resolution file with a transparent background for optimal results. You simply cannot achieve this by pulling a photo from Facebook. Not only are you risking the quality of the logo, pulling from Facebook automatically gives the logo a white background.

“Okay if you can’t pull from Facebook, why don’t you just pull pictures from our website?” Again, while this can be done, that does not mean it should be done. Pictures on websites are formatted to fit a specific spot in the design. Frequently, they are cropped and resized to fit different screen sizes. When you pull a photo from a website, it will remain the same dimensions that were specified for the design of the website. Just like Facebook, chances are the pictures will not be high enough resolution or in the correct file format to use in a professional design.

Besides pictures, providing the designer with copy for the design is essential. Graphic designers are not writers and don’t know your business well enough to produce copy themselves. Do not send over a .jpeg or a .png file for copy. Graphic designers are unable to copy and paste text from a .jpeg or .png file. This would force the designer to have to re-type all the text provided which can cause typos or spelling mistakes. Send over a word document or a pdf with all the copy they need to get started.

Pay Attention to the File Format

  • JPEG – Logos or anything that needs to have a transparent background are not to be sent in a .jpeg or file format. High resolution pictures in a .jpeg format is acceptable.
  • PNG – Logos, icons, or any other graphics with a transparent background should be sent over as a high resolution .png file.
  • PDF – While .pdf files are not the preferred method of receiving files, it is possible to pull pictures and logos from .pdf files. Typically, if no other file format is available, a .pdf can be acceptable.
  • Illustrator (.ai), Photoshop (.psd), or InDesign (.indd) or .eps file.

When dealing with logos, icons, or other graphics, all these file types are the preferred file type to a graphic designer. From any of these, we can easily manipulate and save the graphics into whatever file format we need.

When in doubt, ask questions. We are always happy to answer any questions you may have. From personal experience, I have always preferred answering questions than back and forth with a client trying to get them to send over exactly what I need.

Written by:
Ali Menard
Development & Graphics Team Member

Reading Time: 4 minutes

The country is reconsidering the value and potential benefits of different forms of products derived from Marijuana or Cannabis. Since this is a state issue and not necessarily a federal issue, lets focus on the states, and which states have laws in favor or against the differing degrees of legality for cannabis. To be clear we are not taking any sides in this debate, but simply highlighting the potential for growth of the industry and how the different states will need to determine how cannabis companies will be allowed to promote and advertise their products and services.  

They breakdown to the following categories this way. Legalized, Medical & Decriminalized, Medical, Decriminalized, CBD only, and Fully Legal.

The industry seems to be taking several cues from the Beer/Liquor & Wine industry and how it has negotiated and determined what rules and restrictions each media channel will follow. The long standing “Alcohol Industry” standard for advertising was that 70% or more of an ad medium’s viewership had to be 21 or older. That was recently revised to the new standard that 71.6% of the audience must be 21 or older. Additionally, alcohol advertising’s creative messages should not be designed to target or appeal to people under the age of 21. Using cartoon characters etc. is discouraged. The advertising cannot promote brands based on alcohol content or its effects. Lastly, the ads must not encourage irresponsible drinking.

As an example of how states are applying a similar line of thinking with regards to its regulation of cannabis advertising, Colorado law states that cannabis companies cannot advertise on television or radio without “reliable evidence that no more than 28.4% of the publication’s viewership is reasonably expected to be under the age of 21.” This rule is also applied to print and digital media. Of course, some digital properties can add “age gating” to help enforce this.

Cannabis advertising has various levels of censoring by social media platforms like Instagram, Snapchat and TikTok.

One example to consider is the city of Denver. The city at first, was not allowing billboards, except for company store signs. Any advertising visible from the streets, sidewalks, parks, or other public places within the city limits was prohibited. Thanks to changes to a 2019 bill overhauling the marijuana industry regulations, restrictions were eased. Those same businesses may now utilize outdoor advertising if it is placed at least 500 feet away from schools, playgrounds and churches. This is similar to the restrictions billboards must comply with regarding Alcohol.

In the lead up to these easing of restriction, several dispensaries skirted the laws by sponsoring sections of the “Adopt-a-highway-Program.” This secured the companies name on signs along highways as partners with the state DOT, which maintained regular clean ups of 2 mile stretches of the highway in CO. More than 48% of the programs 248 miles of highways in 2018 were sponsored by marijuana companies.

One of the key concerns, most often cited as reasons for restricting advertising methods, are based upon a myriad of studies about how cannabis products can alter the developing mind of younger people, who have not reached adulthood yet. Despite society’s declining concern over the risks associated with cannabis use, neuropsychiatric conditions, automobile crashes and substance use disorders are often sited in studies as negative outcomes more associated with teens than with adults.  In 2019, the Surgeon General’s report warned, “Cannabinoid receptors are crucial for brain development, which is why cannabis use during adolescence carries special risks.”.

A recent study was published in the “Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs” led by Dr. Pamela J. Trangenstein, Associate Professor of Health Behavior at the UNC-Chapel Hill Gilling’s School of Global Public Health. The research of 172 teens, ages 15 to 19, who lived in states with legal recreational marijuana and who used the drug at least once, reported that compared with those that never saw a billboard or storefront ad, those that said they saw them “Most of the time” or “Always” had seven times the odds of frequent cannabis use and nearly six times the odds of having Cannabis use disorder. Ironically, Teens who occasionally saw some form of cannabis ad on Instagram were 85% less likely to use marijuana frequently compared to those that never saw such promotions.

So is a takeaway from an advertising perspective, that outdoor advertising is more effective at promotion of certain products, than other forms of advertising like social media? Or is it that that some limited and defined parameters modeled after the Alcohol industry, like the distance from schools, playgrounds and churches should be strictly adhered too?

Who is ultimately responsible for cannabis advertising? The “Advertiser” or the “Vendor” that owns the platform. It seems to be a mix of responsibilities based upon the type of media. With OOH, the largest player Lamar, has published a slightly more restrictive policy directive than the state, at least in Colorado. Lamar’s rules for Cannabis ads include the Minimum of 85% of the targeted audience must be 21 or older, vs the state rule of 71.6%.

It’s other guidelines mirror much of the Alcohol and Cannabis laws currently in place.

  • Copy must not appeal to minors
  • Slag words like “Weed” or “Pot” cannot be used
  • No images of the plant or leaf
  • No mention or image of ingestible products or paraphernalia
  • No false Health Claims
  • No images of any product that is ingestible or edible
  • All copy must first be approved by Lamar and is subject to state and local authorities.
  • Disclaimers may be required in select markets

It should be recommended that the Cannabis industry continue to take their lead from the alcohol beverage industry. They should pool their resources of the different advocacy groups, to focus efforts now to study, establish, and publish guidelines of “best practices” for the nation, as it relates to advertising of Cannabis products. Codify the restrictions intended to keep the products out of the purview of children. Distinctions should be drawn that better define the right-minded promotion of legal Cannabis products. Early adoption and codification of the standards pre-emptively should head off government intervention and potential heavy handed crushing regulations that can often follow.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

True collaboration happens when each team member stays in their own lane. According to research done by the Harvard Business Review (as noted in an article by Project Risk Leader), clearly defining people’s roles and responsibilities matters more when determining a team’s success. When working on a plan for each of our clients or even on our own internal materials, we all have our place to take and it’s crucial that we each focus on what our individual jobs are to get things done.

By concentrating on what we’re individually responsible for, we avoid redundancy and doing excess work. This saves time and money.  According to a recent survey done by Zapier, people spend approximately four to five hours a day on core job functions. That won’t cut it when there are deadlines to make and projects to complete. There is only so much time in the day and in our industry, you can’t waste a minute of it.

With tasks assigned, teams set, and targets to hit, we ensure that everything gets done in a timely manner. This works especially well when those assigned to a task are experts in their field. While we ensure that cross training happens in our office, so that there is always coverage, we still consider the lead person in each department, whether that be a digital specialist, social media specialist, OOH specialist, etc. as the one taking charge on their share of the project we are working on.

Focusing on specific assignments lowers the risk of missing important tasks. We’ve all worked with someone who feels they need to jump in on a task that wasn’t theirs to begin with and inevitably they end up not getting their own work done. By keeping focused on each of our jobs and goals, we eliminate delays and missed opportunities in our own work.

It’s also good to point out that moving into someone else’s lane and stepping on their toes can create unhealthy competition between colleagues. No team works well when there are people on it that feel angry or frustrated. A study was done by Oxford University’s Saïd Business School that showed that workers are 13% more productive when happy. Teams that work well together are made up of happy employees. Happy employees are pleased with their jobs and in turn produce better work.

Having each member of the A3 Media team focus on their department, allows us to get more done in less time, bring additional attention to details, and work smarter not harder. After nearly 30 years, we pride ourselves on being a well-oiled machine. That doesn’t happen by chance.

Our teams work as individual spokes in the wheel. Each person has his or her own responsibilities and understands what to focus on to keep things rolling. We’ve even taken classes and received certifications in our own various fields of expertise. Whether it be business development and client relations, to various levels of media planning for TV, radio, OOH, digital and so on, to trafficking and accounting, we are all growing and moving in the same forward direction. And with that, we guarantee our focus is on what’s most important to our clients… their media goals and campaign success.

Reading Time: 2 minutes
Steps on a wall with the words "Follow These Easy Steps"

If I had a nickel every time, I have heard that…

Let me explain. After every buy placed here at A3 Media, our traffic and reconciliation department sends out a brief (one sheeter) “Procedure Letter” to each vendor. This procedure letter details the items we will need from the vendor to help us review and then ultimately approve invoices for payment in a timely manner. Receiving this information is important for us, but it’s also important to the vendor as they all want to get paid.

The most important item on this procedure letter is where and how invoices are to be submitted. In addition, each advertising medium has unique requirements specific to the medium. For example: for out of home, we require proof of posting, for TV/Cable we require programming information, radio we need to see dayparts, etc. We remind the vendor, if there is Added Value on our campaign and it does not run, we will take credits. The point here is that all these requirements are listed and then sent to our vendors for signature prior to the start of all our campaigns. I will also add that our team schedule’s introduction calls with all our new vendors to introduce ourselves and go over these details that are listed on this “Procedure Letter.”

It’s now 6 weeks after this correspondence and the start of the campaign (solely with new vendors) when things can go a little sideways. At this point we have received our first invoice and now our team is looking for the information we had requested in our “Procedure Letter” to reconcile the invoice. We need to make sure that what was contracted, was in fact delivered. We need that information to approve invoices for payment as well as serve as supporting documentation to our clients that what they paid for was received. This might sound weird, but we prefer to pay promptly and not necessarily sit on invoices until the last minute. If we have the information that we need to approve payment, then it gets moved to final processing.

Often after we reach out to these new vendors, we get a response of “What Procedure Letter.” This usually sets off a few emails back and forth of some funny responses like “I didn’t sign any Procedure Letter” or my personal favorite is “O yeah, I remember that, but I didn’t read it.” It’s the ones that don’t read the letter, sign it, and send back that we have growing pains with. This letter is to help them as much as it’s helps us and our client. We have had several cases when a vendor would sign the procedure letter and agree to the terms just to get the buy.

We here at A3 Media have had the privilege of collaborating with some incredible people and vendors through the years. We are always adjusting our procedures to ensure that there are no surprises for both parties. We value our partnerships and want to work together to ensure smooth sailing ahead.

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Tackling your first professional job can be exciting and overwhelming at the same time. How do people handle the pressure of stepping out into the “real world”? Take it from me, going from a college graduate to an employee during a global pandemic is a challenge! The search for a job right out of college can be touch and go for a little while, add a pandemic to it and you feel like you’ve hit a wall. But eventually your first job will be upon you.

College can help prepare you for your job in many ways. College prepared me for my job in Graphic Design during the course of my study. Specifically, by teaching me how to use the Adobe Suite of programs for design, instructing me in the design process of creating thumbnails of the work I am doing, helping me to understand the importance of creating multiple drafts to show to the client for feedback, and working with the client to choose the design they like, and finally refining it to their specifications. What college couldn’t prepare me for came immediately after graduation. A worldwide pandemic hit and interrupted my job search. This was not the real world I was expecting!

Luckily for me, this delay allowed me to find a really great job! At A3 Media the office environment is new to me, but I find it has a relaxed, friendly atmosphere. There are some similarities between the classroom and the office, such as setting goals for the work assignments and working with teams. On the job I am able to apply my skills sharing my graphic design knowledge with others. With Adobe Creative Cloud I can utilize proper design etiquette, as well as help others understand design elements.  In the work environment I get to work with clients and socialize with my coworkers. I know that if I do my job well, I can look forward to even more exciting projects in the future.

“If you want to get bigger, more exciting tasks to handle at your new job, you need to knock those trivial ones out of the park. Don’t just shuffle through them. Take care of your assignments and maybe even see if there is a better way to do them.” 

In college my grades helped me to understand how well I was doing. Now in the work environment, I will use feedback from my boss and my coworkers to measure my success.

It will be important to ask questions and share ideas, ask for feedback, develop strong relationships with my coworkers and clients, and try to understand the bigger picture. This will help me to deliver the best result.  

Your first job changes your lifestyle. Going from an intense schedule right up to graduation time and then going into a pandemic lull as I searched for a new job was frustrating. Now that I started my career, my daily life is more structured. I have a plan for each day and know what to expect. I know if I maintain healthy habits, such as a routine schedule, good sleep habits, good time management, eat healthy, and remain open to change, it will make my work life and home life less stressful. Transitioning from college to your first job can be a challenge but if you approach it in the right way, you can be successful.

Written by:
Shavonne Stellato
Development & Graphics Team Member

Reading Time: 2 minutes

A3 Media is proud to announce their partnership with Advanced Practice Education Associates (APEA) on a Q4 media project.

APEA is an industry leader in the continuing education and clinical resources for experienced NPs. Since 1997, they have been the trusted source for nurse practitioner continuing education, certification review courses, study questions and practice tests, books, and clinical tools. With their five star rated presenters and instructors, APEA is known for their effective and engaging teaching skills.

Excited by the new challenge, A3 Media coordinated a layered social media plan that involves: Facebook, Instagram, Google Ads, and LinkedIn campaigns that started running this month and is set to run into January of 2022.

“Although our company is well established and successful, we recognized that we needed assistance in increasing brand awareness and purchases.” said Michelle Perron, APEA Director of Communications and Marketing. “We met with several marketing agencies, and each advocated a sweeping cookie-cutter approach. Our business is not a cookie. Upon meeting with the A3 Media team, we quickly saw the difference. From the outset, A3 Media sought to understand our business and our specific needs. They developed targeted recommendations that reflected their expertise, research, and data analysis. But most importantly, their recommendations reflected our company’s unique characteristics. This focused approach has made us more comfortable with our decision to work with a media agency for the first time.”

Michelle Perron, APEA Director of Communications and Marketing

Understanding the client’s audience and goals was the first objective. With a clear sense of APEA’s needs, A3 Media focused on researching the highest quality markets and targeted opportunities. This allowed for their buying team to find the opportunities which would allow for the greatest engagement and response for APEA and their upcoming in-person and online courses.

“We’re extremely pleased to be working with a national leader such as APEA and gratified that they clearly recognized the difference our Micro Market Media® process makes.” ”We look forward to handling all their needs in 2022 and establishing a long-lasting partnership with them.”

Frank Gussoni, President and Owner of A3 Media

Philadelphia based A3 Media, is known for their strategic media planning, negotiating, and buying services for mid-market and regional businesses. Through their use of the registered trademarked Micro Market Media® methodologies, they provide multi-market companies the strength of national media buys with the control of local market pricing. A3 Media looks forward to a continued partnership with APEA and working with them on their future media planning and buying needs.

Reading Time: 4 minutes
Street signs that say home this way with arrow or office the other way with arrow.

The hot topic over the last year and half has been whether working from home is just as good, if not better than working from the office. While I am sure that many employees lean one way and their employers lean another, it might be a good time to examine the benefits and drawbacks to each.

Back in the 1930’s, famous economist, John Maynard predicted that his own grandchildren would only need to work fifteen hours a week based on technological advancement. His theory was that the average time to accomplish the same work could be done in a fraction of the time. Unfortunately, this hasn’t been the case. While technology has continued to improve over the years, the amount of time people put into work has only gone up. Maybe that’s why the movement to working remotely from home has become so popular and thanks to Covid, it has gotten the push it needed to be more acceptable.

Those that work from home all say the same thing…it allows for more flexibility. No more long commutes or time wasted in conference room meetings. People said that they felt much more productive working from home, compared to working in the office. But why is that? And is that really the case?

Working from the office promotes comradery. Face-to-face meetings with your colleges in person helps to understand better what is happening with those people, creates a more trusting environment and of course promotes teamwork. These are all things you would think any person would want from their job and working environment.

Instead, people today are perfectly fine if all they need to do is put on a decent shirt for a zoom meeting once in a while or have a conference call where they don’t even need to look at someone during the discussion. I get it, working in your pj’s is more comfortable and not shaving or doing your hair ads up to a ton of saved time. But I keep looking for the real reason as to why so many people are not just choosing to work from home but in many cases insisting on it. I keep coming back to the one word that I hear time and time again…FLEXIBILITY.

Professor of Sociology at Middlebury College, Jamie McCallum has been quoted saying, “We find ourselves working longer hours than ever, and our work is always expanding into every nook and cranny of our lives.” Even those that are working from home who appreciate the flexibility of their working environment, admit that sometimes they feel like they are putting in more time doing their work since they don’t have an official start and end time. I see people commenting about this on LinkedIn all the time. Removing the commute has just moved their day to starting before 7:00 am and finishing well after 6:00 pm.

In all the conversations I’ve heard and content I have read about the “working from home vs working form the office” debate, it’s clearly apparent that the real issue isn’t about where people are the most productive but rather how much time they spend working. A Gallup Poll  found that the mean for hours worked by Americans was just over 44 hours per week and another poll showed that 39% of Americans work more than 50 hours a week. Studies have even shown that excessive work and stress levels can create real illness in people.  Doctor Jay Winner, Director of the Stress Management Program for Sansum Clinic in Santa Barbara CA and author of Take the Stress Out of Your Life says, “Stress doesn’t only make us feel awful emotionally, it can also exacerbate just about any health condition you can think of.” According to the American Psychological Association, chronic stress is connected to a number of leading causes of death including cancer, heart disease, lung issues, accidents, and suicide.

If that’s the case, it makes perfect sense why people want and need more flexibility in their work life. Maybe it’s a good thing to have time throughout the day to start and stop, as need be to handle other things happening in life which ultimately helps deal with and ease stress. But don’t be fooled by those in their “work from home” environments that tell you they started work at 7:00 am and finished up around 7:00 pm. Just because they start their day early and end their day late, doesn’t mean they have been working straight through. They’ve simply been utilizing their time in a different way, than the traditional office, 9 to 5er.

Perhaps what we as society really need to evaluate, isn’t where we should be working from but how and why these different environments make us productive. Working in the office absolutely has its benefits and so does working from home. Maybe the future of the working environment should consist of a little bit of both.

While most of the work being done for A3 Media happens together in one office, there are absolutely times when working from home may be needed for our team. Luckily, we work in a very flexible environment where everyone is equipped to do either option.

Reading Time: 3 minutes
The words "New Mindset" with a down arrow to the words "New Results"

Several years ago, in the midst of parenting three active children and managing the crowded family calendar, I read a parenting blog that absolutely changed my entire mindset. The blog said to change your outlook, change “I have to” to “I get to.” For example, instead of saying “I have to take kid #1 to soccer practice” change it to “I get to take kid #1 to soccer practice and watch him do what he loves to do to improve his game.” Instead of saying, “I have to make cupcakes for kid #3’s class party”, say “I get to make cupcakes for kid #3 to bring into class to share with her classmates.”  

WOW! Mind Blown!

Changing this one little word, “have” to “get,” changed my whole outlook. When I am feeling overwhelmed looking at the family calendar and getting a bit frazzled trying to figure out how I am going to manage all the running around, I try to make a conscious effort to change that word. Afterwards, everything just seems to fall into place. What once were chores, now are privileges. As my frame of mind changed, I felt lucky that I can do all those things for my kids.  

Funny thing is, using this method also worked for household chores. For example, a positive reframe turned a feeling like I “had to” clean the house into the realization that I “get to” take an hour listen to a podcast while I mop the floors. And “having to go to the grocery store” changed to “getting an hour All-ByMyself, when I go to the grocery store.”

In these moments, a positive attitude can make all the difference. Research shows there are benefits to being optimistic, from better physical and mental health to longer more satisfying relationships. A small change in terminology can change your entire perspective and what you can accomplish. 

WORDS HAVE POWER.

I wondered, this terminology shift worked so well in my personal life, what would it do to my professional life? So, I figured I would start practicing this at work. And I do mean practice. It’s easy to revert to old habits and list “to do” items as chores. It takes practice to retrain your brain, as an old coach said to me, “practice makes permanent.” I needed to practice reframing my tasks, “I have to pull this report” to “I get to review this report with our client so they can make better decisions and grow their business.” Training co-workers on a new topic or software isn’t a chore anymore, it’s an opportunity to strengthen our business. Having to write another blog becomes a chance to step out of my comfort zone and challenge myself.

Maybe this self-talk sounds a little corny. “Like anything else, [having a positive mindset] is essentially a skill,” said psychologist Dr. Tim Sharp, a leader in the field of positive psychology and the founder and chief happiness officer of The Happiness Institute. He says, “And, like any skill, the more you practice, the better you get. So, make an effort to practice [being positive] as often as you can.”

I’m not saying we all have to be like Ted Lasso with endless positivity. Some days it will be hard. But if you practice looking for the positives and reframe you mind, it will become habit and you will be happier because of it.   

We can choose our attitude and our actions. We can choose how we view our life and work. We can choose privileges over chores. It’s not about what we have to do. It’s about what we get to do.

What do you GET to do today?

Written by:
Jennifer Vanisko
Reconciliation Specialist